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2 edition of American loyalty by citizens of German descent. found in the catalog.

American loyalty by citizens of German descent.

United States. Committee on Public Information.

American loyalty by citizens of German descent.

by United States. Committee on Public Information.

  • 303 Want to read
  • 28 Currently reading

Published by Govt. Print. Off. in Washington .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States.
    • Subjects:
    • Germans -- United States.,
    • World War, 1914-1918.

    • Edition Notes

      Published also in German.

      StatementPub. by Committee on Public Information.
      SeriesWar information series,, no. 6
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsD570.A2 A35 no. 6
      The Physical Object
      Pagination24 p.
      Number of Pages24
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL6602461M
      LC Control Number17026767
      OCLC/WorldCa3854489

        One of the steps to becoming a German citizen is passing the German citizenship test. Read on to find out more. One in every 4 German residents is a migrant. In , roughly million people in Germany had a migrant background. This means that at least one of their parents was not born as a German citizen.   With European entrance into the war, most citizens of the United States, German Americans included, supported neutrality. When, in , loans were needed to support the war efforts on the part of the Germans, many rumors spread that the German American citizens would help finance the war by buying their own bonds.

        "The American troops show much more consideration for the private rights of the inhabitants of the village than did the German troops." —Karl Schramem, Landstrumer of Zermullen If you are a German citizen and born after , then any child born to you would need to be registered within 12 months of birth to get German citizenship. This consular registration is only possible if you have obtained official recognition of your German citizenship, a process which can take many months.

      Immigrants had flooded the United States in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. When the United States declared war on Germany on April 6, , almost a third of Americans were either first or second-generation immigrants. Those born in Germany and even American-born citizens of German descent fell under suspicion of being disloyal.   World War I inspired an outbreak of nativism and xenophobia that targeted German immigrants, Americans of German descent and even the German language. Enlarge this image German-born Robert Prager.


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American loyalty by citizens of German descent by United States. Committee on Public Information. Download PDF EPUB FB2

American Loyalty () [Citizens Of German Descent] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. American Loyalty ()Author: Citizens Of German Descent. texts All Books All Texts latest This Just In Smithsonian Libraries FEDLINK American loyalty by citizens of German descent Item Preview remove-circle American loyalty by citizens of German descent by United States.

Committee on Public Information. Publication date Pages: A tribute to the foreign born, by Woodrow WilsonGerman-American loyalty, by C. KotzenabeAmericans of German origin and the war, by Otto KahnNational service knows no hyphen, by F.W. LehmannThe spirit of '48 inby Franz SigelPlain words by a plain citizen, by Hans RussauOne answer only, by Leo RassieurThe call and the reply, by A.J.

Bucher. American Ancestry Giving Name and Descent, in the Male Line, of Americans Whose Ancestors Settled in the United States Previous to the Declaration of Independence, A D.

A tribute to American loyalty by citizens of German descent. book foreign born / by Woodrow Wilson --German-American loyalty / by C. Kotzenabe --Americans of German origin and the war / by Otto Kahn --National service knows no hyphen --F.W.

Lehmann --The spirit of '48 in / by Franz Sigel --Plain words by a plain citizen / by Hans Russau --One answer only / by Leo Rassieur --The call and. I know that it is hard for Americans to realize the magnitude of the war in which we are involved.

We have problems in this war no other nations have. Fortunately, the great majority of American citizens of German descent have, in this great crisis of our history, shown themselves splendidly loyal to our flag. Reproduced below is the speech recorded by the former U.S.

Ambassador to Germany James W. Gerard in entitled Loyalty and German-Americans. In spite of his pre-war diplomatic service in Germany Gerard was by no means an activist in campaigning for a rapprochement with the Central the contrary he was outspoken in demanding absolute commitment to the cause of crushing the German.

"Writing as a liberal American journalist of German descent and Jewish religious persuasion Mr. Mayer aims—and in the opinion of this reviewer largely succeeds—at scrupulous fairness and unsparing honesty. It is this that gives his book its muscular punch."—Walter L.

Dorn, Saturday Review/5(). If you are descended from a German citizen, you might have a claim. Was my ancestor a German citizen.

Your ancestor is likely to have been a German citizen if he or she was: born in German territory beforegranted a German passport (not being an alien’s passport), or; employed by the government or public sector of Germany before August. German-Americans paved Trumps road into the White House — right through the rural and deindustrialized landscapes of Wisconsin, Michigan, Ohio, and Pennsylvania.

When talking about ethnicity and immigration background, we frequently use labels such as African-American, Asian-American, Italian-American and Mexican-American. is an American.” German American Men Enlist to Prove Loyalty.

Ultimately, the controversy and rancor led to the dissolution of German society in the United States. German American immigrants, much like other ethnic groups who came to the United States, had settled in enclaves where they could enjoy their own language andFile Size: KB.

GERMAN-AMERICAN HISTORY AMERICA'S GERMAN HERITAGE The German-Americans are the largest ethnic element in the U.S.

At least twelve million Germans immigrated to the U.S., according to statistics of the U.S. Census Bureau. Today there are about 60 million Americans of German descent and the number of German-speaking Americans is eight million. The question of German-American loyalty also became an issue during the presidential election campaign, when candidates Woodrow Wilson and Charles Evans Hughes both declared hyphenated Americans to be potentially disloyal.

Another prominent person who spoke out against Americans with purported divided loyalties was former President. If your citizenship status cannot be determined by the German diplomatic or consular mission and in some other cases where the law requires it, you will need to apply for a German certificate of citizenship (Staatsangehörigkeitsausweis).

Such a certificate might be needed in order to be able to issue you a German passport. John Christgau writes an informative and very interesting history of the internment of German national non-combatants and American citizens or resident aliens of Japanese descent.

You get the German citizenship by descent if your parents register you to the German authorities in the country you are born before you turn one year old. If your parents have different nationalities, you get the German citizenship; however, between the ages of 18 and 23 years old, you will have 5 years to decide which nationality you want to.

German citizenship is mainly acquired and passed on through descent from a German parent. The parent has to be German citizen at the time of the birth of the child. Children who are born to former German citizens do not acquire German citizenship.

In addition, for children born before January 1st, to parents who were married to each other. German Americans (German: Deutschamerikaner) are citizens of the United States of German ancestry; they form the largest ethnic ancestry group in the United States, accounting for 17% of U.S.

population. The first significant numbers arrived in the s in New York and eight million German immigrants have entered the United States since that point. Japanese American Incarceration Images, ; "They're Japanese -- but loyal Americans. Some of the nation's most loyal citizens are those of Japanese, German and Italian descent" -- caption on photograph.

Page 1: Save page Previous: 1 of 2: Next: View Description. Internment of German resident aliens and German-American citizens occurred in the United States during the periods of World War I & World War World War II, the legal basis for this detention was under Presidential Proclamationmade by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt under the authority of the Alien and Sedition Acts.

With the US entry into World War I after Germany's Location: United States. German citizenship by descent. German citizenship can be acquired by descent, although it is not always acquired automatically by descent.

Please check the cases below and refer to the section that applies to your individual case. If you probably acquired German citizenship automatically, you can book a passport appointment.In the U.S. Census, 58 million Americans claimed to be solely or partially of German descent.

According to the American Community Survey, 50 million Americans have German ancestry. German Americans represent 17% of the total U.S. population and 26% of the non-Hispanic white population.A person may be born a German citizen by either jus sanguinis, i.e., through descent from his/her parents, or jus soli, i.e., through place of birth.

As a general rule, a child born to a German citizen parent automatically acquires German citizenship at birth through jus sanguinis, regardless of the place of birth.